Friday, October 5, 2012 — Foggy Day

We awoke and thought it was still night, but when we peeked out the slider the fog was so dense you couldn’t see your hand in front of your face. And that was at 8 a.m. Well we’ll forget photos today. We got ourselves together and went to the dining room and had a light breakfast of juice, fruit, pastry and bread. It was a leisurely respite, reading the newspaper and chatting with Philippe. The night before he and I were talking about the different fabrics in the dining room and their guest rooms. He said that he would give me places we could go and look at fabrics. With that in mind, I quickly emailed Danielle at home and asked her to take a photo of the bar stools in our kitchen, which she did.

As sightseeing was out for today, we decided to look at some fabrics. David was beyond thrilled, but once the nausea passed, he said he agreed the stools were getting shabby looking and buying fabric 6,000 miles from home and shipping it back made a lot of sense…. We drove to the Olivades’ showroom and factory in St. Etienne where we had purchased napkins and tablecloths before. They have a nice selection and excellent quality. We were helped by a lovely saleslady who suggested different fabrics and then brought us over to the factory showroom and told us to look through the samples. If we found anything we liked, she said to just bring the swatch back and she would go to the factory and cut what we needed. After looking at rows of samples for a half hour, with David pacing the floor, I decided it was time to narrow down the pattern selection. I got it down to two or three that were in contention. I opened the photo of the stool Danielle sent and it became obvious there was only one pattern to choose. We happily went to the counter, paid for our purchase and we were off.

You guessed it. Time for lunch. The weather was lifting and gave hope the sun would burn off the remaining fog. We decided to drive into St. Remy. We found a parking spot that was tight, but barely viable. I got out before David pulled in. He almost had to exit through the sun roof, that tight. We decided to have lunch at a little restaurant we ate at two years ago. Neither one of us could remember the name, but we knew where to find it. It was quite the surprise to us because its name was Olivade, the same family that owns the factory we just left. I wasn’t all that hungry so chose the beef carpaccio, David chose a sea bass with a tarragon sauce. A glass of local rose rounded out the meal.

After lunch we strolled around St. Remy window shopping, took a few photos, then dashed for the car when the one in the adjoining space pulled out giving room to open a door. We headed out over the Alpilles to get ready for dinner.

This would be our last dinner at Riboto with their coming closing in December, so we were looking forward to it. Again, many friends were coming by for dinner to say hello, so it would be a nice evening for Christine, Philippe, and Jean-Pierre.

Philippe immediately brought a bottle of Mas de la Dame Coin Cache wine, one of our favorites. This vintage was particularly good. For the starter, I opted for the langoustine while David had the tuna carpaccio. The langoustine was fabulous, and the presentation superb (catch our photos) and David said his tuna was terrific, just the right blend of oil and herbs. For our main course, we both went with Merlu, which is called Hake in most places – a firm whitefish. It was superb with a superb sauce and small vegetables perfectly done. Again, David went with cheeses from Christine’s board – Reblochon, Camembert, and Roquefort. We finished with a wonderful dessert of carmelized peaches with raspberries and passion fruit ice cream. Our last meal at Riboto was terrific, but we were sad to see it end.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: